parislemon:

laughingsquid:

Supercut of Movie References to Mainframe Computers

I happen to work in an industry where if anyone actually said “mainframe”, I’d likely hear it. I don’t think I’ve ever heard “mainframe” once in a real conversation.

Tom Cruise On A Tilted Bridge

parislemon:

Kevin Holmes for The Creators Project:

At some point in your life, you’ve had a movie poster on the wall of your home. Maybe in your student days when you thought you were the first person to discover the French New Wave you had the Breathless poster on your wall or Star Wars, Top Gun, Pretty Woman? Who knows. As household decor they’re signifiers of your alleged taste, as attention-grabbing billboards they’re advertisements for escapism and, if done well, they can be icons of design. They’re also a fast ticket to nostalgic memories—just like a song can transport you instantly to another time and place, seeing a poster that maybe once sat on the cover of a VHS tape can take you back in time for a few stolen moments.

Lovely. (And right in my wheelhouse.)

thisistheverge:

Of course Google made a talking shoe for SXSW 2013 (video)
Last year, Google created an entire village near the Convention Center. This year, just outside the convention center, Google has opened a “playground.” And what better way to experience the playground than with a shoe that taunts you with a male, British voice.

Well, would you talk about innovation.

thisistheverge:

Of course Google made a talking shoe for SXSW 2013 (video)

Last year, Google created an entire village near the Convention Center. This year, just outside the convention center, Google has opened a “playground.” And what better way to experience the playground than with a shoe that taunts you with a male, British voice.

Well, would you talk about innovation.

Google and Apple got into internet television mostly because they’d conquered their corners of the desktop and mobile markets and were trying to expand into new spheres. Intel comes to television out of necessity.
And this year, Apple will start making Macs in America again.
The Apple iWatch | askTog

Steve Jobs’s true legacy lies not with his products, but his method, the way he would forge revolutionary products from cold blocks of creativity. I know. I was one of his earliest recruits and watched him develop the method. Steve applied it one project at a time. My hope is that Apple now has teams applying it across many projects, shortening the historic six years between breakthrough products.

Why does this make everything sound so good? Now I really, really want Apple to make an iWatch. I think I’d finally be able to stop pulling my phone out of my pocket when I don’t even need it.

Einhorn sues Apple, marks biggest investor challenge in years | Reuters

I figured this might have happened somewhere down the line.

The only problem is this: Apple has too much money, is unsure of what to do with the surplus, and is unsure of how innovation is going to proceed from this point on.

And truth be told I’m a little worried about the innovation as well. Despite claims to the contrary, I doubt Apple’s share price is going to undergo a massive boost in the next couple of months, and I doubt their rev/earnings will either.

It’s just…falling. I think their best bet right about now is to wait a bit before introducing any new products, so that they have time to get their creativity sorted out. After all, cuttingly innovative ideas take their time to start about.

One more thing. Where’s Jonathan Ive in all of this?